Archive for the ‘Our Working Lives Project’ Category

Healthy Living in the New Year

Our Working Lives Project | January 12, 2017 | By:

a pile of carrots

by Katherine Sanders, PhD

The New Year is a season of promises.  Many of us pledge to make improvements in our lives.  And, of course, many of our promises are about health.  (I’m procrastinating even as I write this – I should be on my way to the gym!)

Your health promises might be like mine, focused on something you know directly impacts your well-being, such as what you eat and how often you move. 

But there is another area of life that also has a direct impact on health – work.  Most of us spend the majority of our waking lives working.  That work experience shapes our mental and physical health.  It either supports or erodes our self-esteem and sense of belonging.  If you’ve worked in an unhealthy work system, you’ve lived this.  It can be a visceral experience.

What most people don’t realize is that we can design work to promote health.  There are decades of research on work’s impact on health.  We know how. So when the WHC invited me to refresh this article from last year, I jumped at the chance.  I’m eager to reach as many people as I can with this message: Work can be healthy for you.  And you deserve healthy work.

It’s been a pleasure to be part of the Shop Talk speaker series.  I’ve enjoyed talking with people from diverse professions and career stages.  What unites us is our interest in creating healthier working lives for ourselves and our colleagues. 

What would 2017 be like for you if one of your resolutions was to increase the health of your working life? Read More


A Black Police Officer Tells His Story

Humanities Programs in Focus, Our Working Lives Project | November 17, 2016 | By:

Corey Saffold presents ShopTalk in Waukesha

What is it like to be a cop, and black?

When a white state trooper pulled over a black off-duty Madison police officer, Corey Saffold, what did the trooper assume about the man with dreadlocks and a gun – officer Saffold’s service pistol – on the passenger seat?  What did the trooper do next? Read More


How We Will Work: Stories from Wisconsin

Our Working Lives Project, Voices from the Field | October 6, 2016 | By:

babyelephant

Here on Humanities Booyah, we curate a mix of voices and ideas. Our interests are eclectic. We are just as interested in hearing from museum directors with tips for reaching out to new audiences as we are in learning about nearly-forgotten Wisconsin authors and their once-famous books.

Our all-time most popular article, however, stands out for being different. “In My Experience: The Work of a Medical Transcriptionist” is a personal story shared with us by a woman named Sue in Menomonee Falls. We had just launched our Working Lives Project when Sue contacted us in response to hearing our director, Dena Wortzel, challenge us to reflect on the unseen work — and workers — all around us.  Sue knew too well what being unseen can mean. Read More


Motherhood and Work: ShopTalk Perspectives

Our Working Lives Project | May 12, 2016 | By:

painting by Carl Wilhelm Kolbe, the younger, called 'Cooper Shop'

The painting is used with permission from The Grohmann Museum Collection at Milwaukee School of Engineering. Painting by Carl Wilhelm Kolbe, the younger; German (1781-1853); Entitled ‘Cooper Shop,’ ca.1816; Oil on canvas; 16 3/4 x 21 3/4 in.

by Carmelo Dávila

“A mother’s work is never done.”

Whether you are a mother or not, you have certainly heard some of the many expressions about the work of motherhood.  They point to the complexity of the ‘job’ and allude to the lack of recognition for this work in society.

May is the month when Mother’s Day is celebrated, so as part of our ongoing fascination with, and examination of, the subject of work, we turn our humanities lens on the work of motherhood. ShopTalk presentations such as ‘Workplace Equity for Mothers’ and ‘Work-Life Balance: Is it an Option for Mothers?’ provide some historical and modern context within which to think about and discuss what mothering entails. We hope you will consider hosting one of these, or any of the more than forty ShopTalk presentations, in your community! Read More


Report Back: The Black Workers Forum

Our Working Lives Project | April 28, 2016 | By:

Collage of poster and murals at the Madison Labor Temple.

A collection of murals and signs on view at the Madison Labor Temple during the Black Workers Forum. Photos by Faron Levesque.

Work is something we all do, like sleeping and eating, in our own way. Work can be very personal, but none of us works in a vacuum. Life is work, and work connects to everything else.

This week, Faron Levesque, a PhD candidate in the History Department at UW-Madison, gives us her thoughts on the subject. She specializes in social movements and the cultural history of gender. As such, she sees the connection between work and current social movements that address inequities in housing, debt, education, incarceration, healthcare….and more. Read More


100 Years of Pulitzer

Humanities Programs in Focus, Our Working Lives Project | February 17, 2016 | By:

new york may 2011 049

Big News! Usually we are giving grants, but we are thrilled to be on the receiving end this time.

We are grateful to the Pulitzer Prizes Board for an award of over $20,000 to put toward Celebrating Excellence: One Hundred Year of Wisconsin Pulitzer Prize Winners.

Radio programs, publications, statewide events, and an award for high school journalists, all happening throughout 2016 in Wisconsin, are part of the nationwide commemoration of the 100th anniversary of the Pulitzer Prizes. We are really excited to be part of this effort to raise awareness of the state’s past and present journalistic and literary stars and their accomplishments. Read More


Reflections: Our Favorite Humanities Experiences of 2015

Humanities Programs in Focus, Our Working Lives Project, Tips for Grant Writers, Voices from the Field | January 20, 2016 | By:

Header-imageSMALL


The past year has been an important year at the WHC. We have been working hard to use our online presence to support and strengthen the statewide humanities community. These efforts include using Facebook to spread inspiration, encourage curiosity, and celebrate your work, and ours. We also participate in the lively and often reverential Twitter conversation about the public humanities.

And here, on Humanities Booyah, we are sharing best practices for public programming, talking about the challenges of writing grant proposals, and highlighting voices, ideas and projects with articles written just for you. A year ago, we declared our goals for this online magazine. In the coming year, we will be Read More


Health, Work, and Healthy Work: Human Factors Engineering

Our Working Lives Project, Voices from the Field | October 21, 2015 | By:

Basic needs
Katherine Sanders
 is a human factors engineer. She specializes in sociotechnical systems, essentially what makes work meaningful and healthy for people. She explains, “It’s a small, specialized field that most folks, even other engineers, have never heard of.” We met Katherine as part of our Working Lives Project. She runs workshops and consults in workplaces to help organizations and individuals learn how work either supports health or leads people toward illness.  Ergonomics is part of her background, the study of people’s efficiency in their working environment. But instead of designing physical work places or products, she focuses on the psychological and social aspects of work, and the impacts work has on personal health.  She is passionate about what she does: “I care about how the work gets done and its quality, and I care just as much about the health and well-being of the people doing the work.”

In this essay, Katherine gives us a glimpse into her world, what motivates her, and her Top 5 list for creating work systems that promote health and meaning, as well as productivity and efficiency.  Read More


Working on ShopTalk: Behind the Scenes at the WHC

Humanities Programs in Focus, Our Working Lives Project | August 26, 2015 | By:

Working on ShopTalk

 

People think about and talk about work all the time. We always have, and we probably always will.

A year ago, we launched our Working Lives Project.  What we hope to add to the conversation is a humanities approach that is inclusive, reflective, and that considers how we individually and collectively are ‘making a living and making a life’ through our work. Why do we work? What combination of economics, politics, ambition, and tradition pushes us to get up and do what we do every day? 

These are the questions that drive our efforts to build ShopTalk, a speaker/discussion program of the Working Lives Project.  Read More


Working through a Digital Divide: Libraries as Community Centers

Our Working Lives Project, Voices from the Field | August 5, 2015 | By:

 
Amy Lutzke is the Assistant Director at the Dwight Foster Public Library in Fort Atkinson. In May, Amy shared with you some of the ways she responds to the interests of her community to plan and promote successful library events.  
 
I recently visited with Amy at ‘her’ library. I wanted to see the Lorine Niedecker room, built during the library renovation a few years ago. Talking about the new space, and how it is used, I asked Amy what she does on a typical day.  I was curious, how has the job of a librarian evolved in her experience?

Read More