Archive for the ‘Tips for Grant Writers’ Category

Announcing Fall Grant Awards!

Humanities Programs in Focus, Tips for Grant Writers | October 30, 2019 | By:

We are excited to share the following list of Grant Awards totaling $42,700!

The Wisconsin Humanities Council administers the only grant program in the state devoted to the public humanities. Every year, we give away $200,000 in grants to organizations that provide original programs for people all over the state. Our grant program is open seven times a year, with two categories of grants (smaller and larger grants), so we can respond directly to the people who know the needs of their community.

Grant applications are reviewed by our board members, a group of people who represent the breadth of the humanities and the diversity of our state. This October, board members met in Madison to make funding decisions about Major Grants. We are excited to share the following list of Grant Awards totaling $42,700!

The Wisconsin Humanities Council couldn’t fund these projects without support from the National Endowment of the Humanities, the State of Wisconsin, and private donors. This money invested in our state multiplies locally! Learn more…

WHC board meeting October 2019

Board members meet three times a year in person to review Major Grant Applications. Pictured here are board members at the Pyle Center on UW-Madison campus. CENTER: WHC Director Dena Wortzel and WHC Board Chair Arnold Chevalier.


 

Congratulations to the following 8 organizations recently awarded Major Grants and Mini Grants in Brown, Waukesha, Milwaukee, Dane, Door and Marathon Counties:

$2,000 to Northeast Wisconsin Technical College Educational Foundation (Green Bay) | Kao Kalia Yang Presentation

WHC funds will help the college bring Hmong author Kao Kalia Yang to the Green Bay campus to provide a community lecture and workshop open to staff, students, and the community. Yang is the author of “The Latehomecomer: A Hmong Family Memoir” and “The Song Poet.” Her works speaks to the refugee and immigrant experiences and she will address issues of literacy and education, as well as race and class of the Hmong people.  This project is part of our focus on race and ethnicity.

$2,000 to UWM Waukesha Foundation |  Southeast Wisconsin Festival of Books

We’re pleased to again support the Southeast Wisconsin Festival of Books, a free community celebration of literacy and arts. The 2019 theme is Opening Doors: A Decade of the Southeast Wisconsin Festival of Books.

$2,000 to Crossroads at Big Creek (Sturgeon Bay) | The Big Dig at Crossroads, Fall 2019 

The Big Dig is an authentic archaeological experience for middle school students of Door County. Funds from the grant enable students to have an archaeological experience that include shovel testing, unit excavation, a flintknapping demonstration, flotation machine use, and the cleaning and classification of artifacts.

$2,000 to Wisconsin Veterans Museum Foundation | Talking Spirits XXI: Forest Hill Cemetery Tour

This popular award-winning living history program illuminates the lives of many prominent and lesser-known figures in Wisconsin history. This year’s theme, “Service Beyond the War,” featured five theatrical performances by actors portraying people with a range of perspectives on both the Civil War and the growth of Wisconsin afterward.

$10,000 to UW-Milwaukee | The Gun Violence Project: Narratives of Violence in Milwaukee 

We’re proud to help fund an important collaborative effort to map the human experiences of gun violence in Wisconsin, beginning with the Milwaukee area. Using a digital platform, this evolving resource will share the audio stories, images, and interactive maps to help engage the community understanding the realities of gun violence at its aftermath.

$5,525 to First Stage Milwaukee | Courage in Storytelling: Workshops inspired by regional premiere GRETEL! 

We’re pleased to again support First Stage’s Foundry Stage Series production and workshops. The musical theater production reinterprets and combines the folktales of “Vasilisa the Beautiful” and “Hansel and Gretel,” relating how a girl overcomes life’s obstacles with courage, perseverance, determination and kindness. The reach of this project includes extended programming for Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee.

$9,175 to Wisconsin Institute for Public Policy and Service (WIPPS) | Conversations About Immigration in Marathon County 

WHC funds support a three-part series designed to lay out facts, bust myths, provide local perspective and make space for conversations on how the issue of immigration affects central Wisconsin communities. This project is part of our focus on race and ethnicity.

$10,000 to Music Theatre of Madison | INDECENT: A Tony-winning play with extensive significance 

We’re pleased to support this ambitious presentation of “Indecent,” a play the explores themes of anti-semitism, censorship, sexuality, and love of art. In association with this production, MTM will work in collaboration with numerous community partners to provide supporting educational materials.


 


Grants 101: Healing through the Humanities

Humanities Programs in Focus, Tips for Grant Writers | December 1, 2016 | By:

A poem and artwork by a participant in an Untold Stories workshop

It’s through the reflection allowed by the humanities that we gain the perspectives that help us heal.

by Meg Turville-Heitz

We’ve been looking at measuring the impact of humanities programs through evaluation. Last time, I wrote about evaluating impact internally – how we improve our own programs with honest post mortems. This article focuses on our external impact and talking about why the humanities matter. Read More


Grants 101: Evaluating your relationships

Humanities Programs in Focus, Tips for Grant Writers | November 2, 2016 | By:

Picturing Milwaukee People & Places

Experiences with the humanities change lives. We know that. We also know that beyond the tally of who participated directly, the impact of an encounter with ideas can ripple outward in unpredictable ways.

by Meg Turville-Heitz

A few weeks ago I started a conversation about evaluating our impact in “Taking measure of your humanities project.” I talked about how we can evaluate impact both from the perspective of how programming affects how organizations operate, and what individual participants take home. This week, I’m sharing the story of Professor Arijit Sen’s project, Picturing Milwaukee, as a case study in using participant feedback to improve programming and organizational relationships.

I visited Sen at his UW-Milwaukee Building-Landscape-Culture field school this past summer to talk about how his project evolved since he received two Major Grants from the Council several years ago. His experience was enlightening. He looked beyond the feel-good successes in participant evaluations of his project to focus on where he missed the mark.

In thinking through those short-comings, Sen built a far better project and more meaningful partnerships that led to a much deeper community impact than he had initially imagined. Read More


Grants 101: Taking measure of your humanities project

Tips for Grant Writers | September 22, 2016 | By:

Electric flash

It was a fabulous project. The best project. Everyone said so …

Taking measure of your humanities project

by Meg Turville-Heitz

Evaluations. Ugh, why? You’ve completed your project and it’s time to move on to the next thing. Sometimes it feels like a forced exercise in number crunching and self-scrutiny that can kill the buzz from your successes. Other times it may leave you feeling like you are sugar-coating a big lemon.

Evaluations get a bad rap. Really. Good evaluations promote better projects – both our ability to offer guidance, and your ability to design great programming. Evaluation can help institutions improve how they do their work and provide a way to talk about why the humanities matter. Thus we’re taking a step back and looking again at how we measure what we measure. We’re realizing we can do better. And there are some pretty compelling reasons why we need to. While reporting numbers and dollars is a function of grant funding everywhere, it’s really the impacts that matter, especially in the humanities.  Read More


Our New Grant Program Director is Here!

Humanities Programs in Focus, Tips for Grant Writers | July 14, 2016 | By:

New WHC grant program director's farm

This is where our new Grant Program Director, Meg Turville-Heitz, calls home.

We are excited to introduce you to Meg, our new Grant Program Director!

Hi! I’m Meg, the new WHC Grant Program Director.  I’m the newest member of the Wisconsin Humanities Council staff and I’ve been asked to introduce myself. Pleased to meet you! I’m eager to learn about your public humanities programs and work with you on your grant applications.

I’m a writer; writing an introduction should be easy. But I have that Midwest “humble” ingrained from birth, that tendency to not crow, to blush at praise, and to self-deprecate whenever there are opportunities to shine. Add to that an irreverent and somewhat gallows-minded sense of humor and I spend a lot of time kicking myself, mostly metaphorically, with under-the-breath “I shouldn’t have said that” moments.

But I digress.

Read More


Reflections: Our Favorite Humanities Experiences of 2015

Humanities Programs in Focus, Our Working Lives Project, Tips for Grant Writers, Voices from the Field | January 20, 2016 | By:

Header-imageSMALL


The past year has been an important year at the WHC. We have been working hard to use our online presence to support and strengthen the statewide humanities community. These efforts include using Facebook to spread inspiration, encourage curiosity, and celebrate your work, and ours. We also participate in the lively and often reverential Twitter conversation about the public humanities.

And here, on Humanities Booyah, we are sharing best practices for public programming, talking about the challenges of writing grant proposals, and highlighting voices, ideas and projects with articles written just for you. A year ago, we declared our goals for this online magazine. In the coming year, we will be Read More


Grants 101: Be Good, Be Brief, and…

Tips for Grant Writers | December 2, 2015 | By:

Be-Brief

Be Good, Be Brief, and…Be Gone, a board member of the historical museum I once directed used to advise me.  A retired corporate executive and the organization’s treasurer, he was fond of dispensing aphorisms with a wink in his eye.  He taught me, a graduate student with more words than available pages, the importance of a one-page memo.  He taught me how to get to the point.

One challenge of writing a strong grant proposal is Read More


What Is(n’t) Oral History. Or, the Rise of the “Oral History of [Fill in the Blank].”

Tips for Grant Writers, Voices from the Field | November 18, 2015 | By:

The-Simpsons-Season-15-Episode-2-My-Mother-the-Carjacker

 

Troy Reeves works as an Oral Historian for the UW-Madison Archives, which is a part of the UW-Madison Libraries. For over ten years,  Troy has been keeping an eye on where and how the term ‘oral history’ pops up on the internet. It turns out that not all of the claims meet his professional criteria for best-practices in recording, preserving and archiving personal stories. 

After arguing for the power and the value of Oral History in a previous Humanities Booyah article, he suggested it might be useful to address the common use of the term for those of us working in the public humanities. Troy’s love for pop-culture doesn’t mean he wants to see the work of Oral Historians go completely rogue, at least not entirely.

Read More


Announcing Grants for Northern Wisconsin

Tips for Grant Writers | August 12, 2015 | By:

NW-WI-Writers-Fest-quote

Whether you think of it as north of HWY 8, HWY 29, or HWY 10, northern Wisconsin is known for many things—snow, bears, outdoor sports, lakes and woods and some would say, a unique Up North culture. Joel Friederich, an Associate Professor of English at UW-Barron County, is doing all he can to add literature to the mix by strengthening what he calls a ‘NW Wisconsin literary landscape.’ 

This weekend is the second annual Northwest Wisconsin Writers Festival. How a connection to place can inform and ground writing will be one of the topics of discussion among authors and audiences. The featured authors, Nickolas Butler and Marnie Mamminga, are both known for stories and characters set in northern Wisconsin. Read More


Grants 101: Working With Humanities Experts

Tips for Grant Writers | July 1, 2015 | By:

Grant Program Director Mark Livengood shares some tips for grant writers periodically here as part of Humanities Booyah. Mark consults in person and over the phone with people all the time, listening to ideas and talking through potential public humanities projects. He is approachable and insightful. He also notes that some questions come up again and again. This week he gives us some of his talking points on the subject of Humanities Experts. 

We have clearly stated  criteria for judging grant proposals listed in our Grant Guidelines. One is that projects should be firmly grounded in the humanities: “Strong public humanities programs engage humanities experts and community members so that both local knowledge and academic expertise are respected.”

So what, exactly, do we mean by ‘humanities expert?’

Ojibwe artist Wayne Valliere works with students

Ojibwe artist Wayne Valliere works with students as part of a 2013 WHC Major Grant-funded project called “These Canoes Carry Culture: Birchbark Canoe Building for At-Risk Youth.”

When describing the grant proposal they’re working on, people sometimes ask me “What does the WHC mean by humanities expert?”  I usually mention the definition included in our grant guidelines.  In the spirit of the WHC’s Working Lives Project, I’ve reformatted that definition into a brief position description for a WHC humanities expert: Read More