THEME

Immigration in Wisconsin

BRAND NEW: Check out our NEW talks about Immigration in Wisconsin!


  • A catalog of all ShopTalk presenters listed in ABC order is here.

Immigration to Wisconsin is not new. But the issues are complicated. Current concerns can make them hard to fully comprehend. This series of ShopTalk offers history, stories, and the law to help us think about immigration today.


Becoming a Citizen

presented by Laurie S. Z. Greenberg

People who are born in the U.S. are automatically granted citizenship. A naturalized citizen is a person who was born in another country but has lawfully become a citizen of the United States under the U.S. Constitution and laws. What are the rights and privileges that come with citizenship? Do naturalized citizens enjoy all of them? And what are the responsibilities?...


Emerging Refugee Crisis: How Will Wisconsinites Respond?

presented by Khalil “Haji” Dokhanchi

The number of people fleeing poverty, conflict, and persecution around the world is creating an unprecedented number of global migrants and refugees. In the United States, and here in Wisconsin, we are facing growing pressure to accommodate them. Many Americans are asking, “Why do they want to come here? Will our communities be harmed? Who will pay the price for integration and services?” Answers to these questions have legal, economic, political and ethical implications...


Laura Ingalls Wilder is an American icon, known for her novels about her family’s experience as American pioneers in the 1870s. But does her Little House on the Prairie series have meaning for today’s immigrants and refugees to the Midwest?...


The fate of undocumented immigrant workers and Wisconsin's $43 billion dairy industry are closely intertwined. On Wisconsin dairy farms today immigrants make up a majority of the workforce. Many farmers say that deporting workers would harm the industry...


Melting Pot or Pot Luck? Immigrants in the U.S.

presented by Laurie S. Z. Greenberg

For most of the 20th Century, the United States was described as a cultural melting pot. Immigrants were assumed to arrive, assimilate, and gradually melt into American society. Today we talk about immigrants, and immigration, in different terms. These terms acknowledge the ways in which immigrants engage in work life and the economy, as well as social and educational systems. This ‘integration’ changes both the immigrants themselves, as well as the community they find themselves in...


In 1969, statewide grape boycotts reduced grape consumption in Wisconsin by 41%. Migrant workers in Wisconsin were part of a nationwide movement to gain union recognition for migrant labor, as well as...


Mexican immigrants and Mexican American migrants, like other 19th century European immigrants, settled in both rural and urban Wisconsin communities. Jesus Salas’s grandparents were sharecroppers in Texas. They lost their ties to...


More Themes

Women's Working Lives – Women face unique obstacles in their lives and careers. These ShopTalk presenters share personal perspectives and inspiring stories that will jumpstart conversations in your community about facing stereotypes, breaking molds and what work looks and feels like for women today.

Informed Communities – There’s more to the past, present, and future of work than the day’s news headlines. ShopTalk’s historians and experienced professionals bring their insight to discussion of the ‘new’ economy, healthy workplaces, the labor movement, and more.