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Request for Proposals

Hands blowing glass
Seeking Public Humanities Projects that explore the Subject of Work

The Working Lives Project takes a humanities approach to a subject we all know something about: Work.

We know that the subject of work is hotly debated and under scrutiny. We believe the tools of the humanities can help us reflect deeply, act wisely, and grow empathy and respect for each other.

To this end, we have issued a Request for Proposals on the subject of work. We encourage community organizations across the state to submit grant proposals for projects about the past, present and future of work. Projects must focus on the human aspects of work and working, broadly defined.

Wondering what a public humanities project about work looks like? Click here to see some past WHC grant-funded projects about work.

To apply, use the regular grant applications and deadlines.

As always, you are encouraged to,contact Mark Livengood, Grant Program Director, with questions and ideas: (608) 265-5595, rlivengood@wisc.edu

I Rode on the Bus

The group that traveled with Arts@Large in summer 2014
50th anniversary of “Freedom Summer”

The historic civil rights campaign, known as “Freedom Summer," organized mostly young white volunteers for a concerted effort to register black southerners who were being denied their right to vote.

Portia Cobb is a filmmaker and associate professor at UW-Milwaukee. She was invited by the Milwaukee-based arts initiative called Arts@Large to travel with 25 students to key civil rights landmarks in Alabama, Tennessee and Mississippi to study this history.

She writes, "My generation is one of the very first to benefit from the efforts of these foot soldier activists who pushed against laws that normalized segregation and inequality for black Americans. For my children, these events are like distant cousins, twice or thrice removed. Many young people today do not know the story of this movement in our shared American history."

Arts@Large received a $10,000 Major Grant for this project. Students from six Milwaukee schools were led in research projects using the Wisconsin Historical Society's "Freedom Summer" archive. A student-designed exhibition has been on display and a documentary film from the trip is in the works.

Read more about the trip in this guest blog post by Portia Cobb.